News & Updates


August 27, 2003 -- New York Times -- Clinton and Nadler Seek Inquiry Into E.P.A. Response to Sept. 11
Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and Representative Jerrold L. Nadler called yesterday for a Congressional inquiry into the Environmental Protection Agency's response to the World Trade Center attack, saying that the agency and the White House had not told the truth about potential health hazards. Continue reading

August 26, 2003 -- New York Times -- Dust And Deception
Last week a quietly scathing report by the inspector general of the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed what some have long suspected: in the aftermath of the World Trade Center's collapse, the agency systematically misled New Yorkers about the risks the resulting air pollution posed to their health. And it did so under pressure from the White House. Continue reading

August 25, 2003 -- New York Times -- Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: City To Review 9/11 E.P.A. Report
The city will review a report by the inspector general of Environmental Protection Agency that says the White House sought to play down possible health risks posed by World Trade Center dust and debris, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said yesterday. Mr. Bloomberg said he would send the report to Christopher O. Ward, commissioner of the city's Department of Environmental Protection. Continue reading

August 25, 2003 -- New York Times -- City To Review 9/11 E.P.A. Report
The city will review a report by the inspector general of Environmental Protection Agency that says the White House sought to play down possible health risks posed by World Trade Center dust and debris, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said yesterday. Mr. Bloomberg said he would send the report to Christopher O. Ward, commissioner of the city's Department of Environmental Protection. Continue reading

August 23, 2003 -- New York Times -- E.P.A. Defends Itself Against 9/11 Rebukes
Officials of the Environmental Protection Agency today defended their response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attack in New York, saying that they had done the best they could in a terrible situation and that a government report was wrong to criticize them. Continue reading

August 9, 2003 -- White House Sway Is Seen In E.P.A. Response to 9/11
An investigation by the Environmental Protection Agency's inspector general into official statements about air quality after the collapse of the World Trade Center has found that White House officials instructed the agency to be less alarming and more reassuring to the public in the first few days after the attack. Continue reading

August 6, 2003 -- New York Times -- Smoke and Dust at Ground Zero Is Linked to Smaller Babies
Scientists say they have measured a slight but significant rise in the percentage of small babies born to women who were around the World Trade Center during or after the terror attack compared with babies of a large sample of pregnant women who were elsewhere at the time. Continue reading

February 21, 2003 -- New York Times -- Little Risk Seen In Downtown Air
Federal health officials have concluded that it is ''very unlikely'' that dust from the World Trade Center attack posed a significant health risk to people who lived downtown. The study, published yesterday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared air and surface dust samples collected in November and December 2001 in 30 downtown buildings with samples from buildings above 59th Street. Continue reading

February 21, 2003 -- New York Times -- Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: Little Risk Seen In Downtown Air
Federal health officials have concluded that it is ''very unlikely'' that dust from the World Trade Center attack posed a significant health risk to people who lived downtown. The study, published yesterday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared air and surface dust samples collected in November and December 2001 in 30 downtown buildings with samples from buildings above 59th Street. Continue reading

February 20, 2003 -- New York Times -- THREATS AND RESPONSES: MENTAL HEALTH; Long-Term Effects of Post-Trauma Events
Among New Yorkers who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after Sept. 11, 2001, those who have lost family members, lost jobs or experienced other stress since the attack are the most likely to still be having symptoms, researchers have found. Continue reading