News & Updates


October 10, 2003 -- New York Times -- Details Emerge on Post-9/11 Clash Between White House and E.P.A.
Tensions between the Environmental Protection Agency and the White House Council on Environmental Quality over informing the public about air safety after the collapse of the World Trade Center may well have been greater than revealed in a report issued … Continue reading

October 3, 2003 -- New York Times -- PUBLIC LIVES; A Public Health Warrior, Tracking 9/11 Trends
Dr. Polly Thomas is leaning over her computer, reviewing a daily graphic chart of people signing up for the World Trade Center Health Registry. Dr. Thomas is an assistant commissioner for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Continue reading

October 3, 2003 -- New York Times -- PUBLIC LIVES; A Public Health Warrior, Tracking 9/11 Trends
DR. POLLY THOMAS is leaning over her computer, reviewing a daily graphic chart of people signing up for the World Trade Center Health Registry. Dr. Thomas is an assistant commissioner for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Continue reading

September 29, 2003 -- New York Times -- You Should Have Seen the Air in ’53; After Sept. 11, Considering History’s Lessons on Pollution
A dry, wheezing, watery-eyed cough became common. The number of emergency room visits climbed, and the theaters in Times Square went dark for lack of business. Smoke and haze drifted across the region. Continue reading

September 25, 2003 -- New York Times -- Fire Officials Upset at End Of a Program For Survivors
The New York City Fire Department is concerned about the scheduled end of a federally funded program that was established after the World Trade Center attack to provide crisis counseling for city firefighters and other survivors. Continue reading

September 24, 2003 -- New York Times -- Metro Briefing | New York: Thousands Enroll In Ground Zero Survey
More than 10,000 people have enrolled in New York City's registry to track health problems caused by the destruction of the World Trade Center, the city reported yesterday, 18 days after the registration began. The participants live in 47 states and nine countries. People who sign up go through a 30-minute interview about where they were on Sept. 11, 2001, their exposure to smoke and dust, and any health problems they have suffered since. Continue reading

September 24, 2003 -- New York Times -- Thousands Enroll In Ground Zero Survey
More than 10,000 people have enrolled in New York City's registry to track health problems caused by the destruction of the World Trade Center, the city reported yesterday, 18 days after the registration began. The participants live in 47 states and nine countries. Continue reading

September 12, 2003 -- New York Times -- Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: Thousands Enroll In 9/11 Study
More than 6,500 people signed up in the first six days to participate in a new multiyear study of the health consequences of the 9/11 terrorist attack, New York City officials said. The World Trade Center Health Registry, which began last Friday, is designed to track up to 200,000 people over the next 20 years and is open to people -- whether or not they have had any adverse health effects -- who were exposed to the dust and smoke from the disaster. Continue reading

September 12, 2003 -- New York Times -- Thousands Enroll In 9/11 Study
More than 6,500 people signed up in the first six days to participate in a new multiyear study of the health consequences of the 9/11 terrorist attack, New York City officials said. The World Trade Center Health Registry, which began last Friday, is designed to track up to 200,000 people over the next 20 years and is open to people -- whether or not they have had any adverse health effects -- who were exposed to the dust and smoke from the disaster. Continue reading

September 11, 2003 -- New York Times -- TWO YEARS LATER: AIR QUALITY; Study Says Ground Zero Soot Lingered
New research into the impact of air pollution from the World Trade Center disaster mostly confirms, for better and for worse, some of the earliest tentative conclusions reached just after the attack, scientists said yesterday. Continue reading