News & Updates


October 26, 2001 -- New York Times -- Safety Questions Remain About Air at Ground Zero
Air quality in Lower Manhattan has gradually improved since the early days after the World Trade Center disaster last month, when a gritty, acrid residue of combustion and dust hung over parts of the city like a shroud. But at certain times, under certain conditions -- usually for brief periods -- the bad air still returns. Continue reading

October 21, 2001 -- New York Times -- The Same Blue Uniform, An Unsettling New Terrain
DETECTIVES Patrick Divers and Al McCoy of the Brooklyn North narcotics squad used to spend their days running buy-and-bust drug operations in Bushwick. But lately, they have been doing different tasks; far different, like searching for body parts in debris from the World Trade Center at the Fresh Kills landfill, and escorting office workers to their buildings at ground zero. Continue reading

October 21, 2001 -- New York Times -- The Same Blue Uniform, An Unsettling New Terrain
DETECTIVES Patrick Divers and Al McCoy of the Brooklyn North narcotics squad used to spend their days running buy-and-bust drug operations in Bushwick. But lately, they have been doing different tasks; far different, like searching for body parts in debris from the World Trade Center at the Fresh Kills landfill, and escorting office workers to their buildings at ground zero. Continue reading

October 18, 2001 -- New York Times -- A NATION CHALLENGED: THE SCHOOLS; Unexplained Ailments at Stuyvesant High
Board of Education officials said yesterday that they were at a loss to explain why dozens of students and teachers at Stuyvesant High School had experienced headaches and breathing problems since returning last week to the building, which is four blocks north of the collapsed World Trade Center. Continue reading

October 18, 2001 -- New York Times -- Unexplained Ailments at Stuyvesant High
Board of Education officials said yesterday that they were at a loss to explain why dozens of students and teachers at Stuyvesant High School had experienced headaches and breathing problems since returning last week to the building, which is four blocks north of the collapsed World Trade Center. Continue reading

October 16, 2001 -- New York Times -- After Attacks, Studies of Dust and Its Effects
Despite a steady stream of data from public agencies showing that the stubborn, eye-stinging plumes of dust from the wrecked World Trade Center pose few risks, thousands of people -- residents and workers in nearby neighborhoods, firefighters, demolition crews, those who fled the attacks -- say they still fear for their health. Continue reading

October 16, 2001 -- New York Times -- After Attacks, Studies of Dust and Its Effects
Despite a steady stream of data from public agencies showing that the stubborn, eye-stinging plumes of dust from the wrecked World Trade Center pose few risks, thousands of people -- residents and workers in nearby neighborhoods, firefighters, demolition crews, those who fled the attacks -- say they still fear for their health. Continue reading

October 15, 2001 -- New York Times -- Notebooks; Surgeon General’s Sojourn
When Dr. David Satcher, the surgeon general, visited New York after the terrorist attacks, he said he wanted to see how his office could help coordinate mental health services. Continue reading

October 15, 2001 -- New York Times -- Notebooks; Surgeon General’s Sojourn
When Dr. David Satcher, the surgeon general, visited New York after the terrorist attacks, he said he wanted to see how his office could help coordinate mental health services. Continue reading

October 11, 2001 -- New York Times -- A NATION CHALLENGED: THE AIR QUALITY; Contaminants Below Levels For Long-Term Concerns
The quality of the air has become a matter of widespread anxiety among people who live or work in Lower Manhattan -- anxiety compounded in many cases by open disbelief in assurances from government and public health officials that the air, while acrid and sometimes smelly, is generally safe to breathe. Continue reading