Archive of News (2002)

News stories by year:

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE: REGIONAL MARKET — Downtown Manhattan; A Big Victim Is Still Empty After a Year

Only the magnitude of disaster a few yards away could have eclipsed the painful story of the former Federal Office Building at 90 Church Street. This imposing one-million-square-foot Art Deco structure was handsomely renovated in the late 1990’s by Boston Properties, which holds the master lease. Continue reading

THREATS AND RESPONSES: RESCUER’S HEALTH; Lung Ailments May Force 500 Firefighters Off Job

As many as 500 New York City firefighters may have to retire early as a result of ”respiratory disability,” chronic breathing problems caused by their exposure to dense clouds of dust, smoke and fumes at the World Trade Center, health officials said yesterday. Continue reading

THREATS AND RESPONSES: RESCUER’S HEALTH; Lung Ailments May Force 500 Firefighters Off Job

As many as 500 New York City firefighters may have to retire early as a result of ”respiratory disability,” chronic breathing problems caused by their exposure to dense clouds of dust, smoke and fumes at the World Trade Center, health officials said yesterday. Continue reading

PROGRAM TO COVER PSYCHIATRIC HELP FOR 9/11 FAMILIES

The American Red Cross and the September 11th Fund said yesterday that they would underwrite the expense of extended mental health treatment for people directly affected by the terrorist attacks last year. The effort may be the most ambitious ever undertaken by charitable organizations to address the emotional needs of disaster victims. Continue reading

Opposition To Cleaning Plan

A group of scientists and residents in Lower Manhattan denounced the Environmental Protection Agency yesterday for what they called an inadequate plan to rid buildings of contaminants from the collapse of the World Trade Center. The E.P.A. had released a plan to clean homes south of Canal Street in May, asking residents to request a cleanup by Sept. 3. But critics who gathered outside the agency’s office at 290 Broadway yesterday argued that the area covered was too small, the deadline too soon and the call for residents to request cleaning too lax. Continue reading

Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: Opposition To Cleaning Plan

A group of scientists and residents in Lower Manhattan denounced the Environmental Protection Agency yesterday for what they called an inadequate plan to rid buildings of contaminants from the collapse of the World Trade Center. The E.P.A. had released a plan to clean homes south of Canal Street in May, asking residents to request a cleanup by Sept. 3. Continue reading

U.S. to Test for Contaminants In 250 Downtown Apartments

The federal Environmental Protection Agency announced plans yesterday to test for dioxins and toxic metals in a sampling of Lower Manhattan apartments whose interiors were coated with ash and dust from the World Trade Center’s collapse. Continue reading

U.S. to Test for Contaminants In 250 Downtown Apartments

The federal Environmental Protection Agency announced plans yesterday to test for dioxins and toxic metals in a sampling of Lower Manhattan apartments whose interiors were coated with ash and dust from the World Trade Center’s collapse. Continue reading

Finding Cure for Hearts Broken Sept. 11 Is as Difficult as Explaining the Cost

The Sept. 11 Fund will spend as much as $55 million to provide mental health care to those traumatized by the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The American Red Cross is also expected to spend tens of millions of dollars to help provide similar kinds of counseling. Continue reading

Finding Cure for Hearts Broken Sept. 11 Is as Difficult as Explaining the Cost

The Sept. 11 Fund will spend as much as $55 million to provide mental health care to those traumatized by the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The American Red Cross is also expected to spend tens of millions of dollars to help provide similar kinds of counseling. Continue reading