Archive of News (2003)

News stories by year:

Metro Briefing | New York: Thousands Enroll In Ground Zero Survey

More than 10,000 people have enrolled in New York City’s registry to track health problems caused by the destruction of the World Trade Center, the city reported yesterday, 18 days after the registration began. The participants live in 47 states and nine countries. People who sign up go through a 30-minute interview about where they were on Sept. 11, 2001, their exposure to smoke and dust, and any health problems they have suffered since. Continue reading

Thousands Enroll In Ground Zero Survey

More than 10,000 people have enrolled in New York City’s registry to track health problems caused by the destruction of the World Trade Center, the city reported yesterday, 18 days after the registration began. The participants live in 47 states and nine countries. Continue reading

Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: Thousands Enroll In 9/11 Study

More than 6,500 people signed up in the first six days to participate in a new multiyear study of the health consequences of the 9/11 terrorist attack, New York City officials said. The World Trade Center Health Registry, which began last Friday, is designed to track up to 200,000 people over the next 20 years and is open to people — whether or not they have had any adverse health effects — who were exposed to the dust and smoke from the disaster. Continue reading

Thousands Enroll In 9/11 Study

More than 6,500 people signed up in the first six days to participate in a new multiyear study of the health consequences of the 9/11 terrorist attack, New York City officials said. The World Trade Center Health Registry, which began last Friday, is designed to track up to 200,000 people over the next 20 years and is open to people — whether or not they have had any adverse health effects — who were exposed to the dust and smoke from the disaster. Continue reading

TWO YEARS LATER: AIR QUALITY; Study Says Ground Zero Soot Lingered

New research into the impact of air pollution from the World Trade Center disaster mostly confirms, for better and for worse, some of the earliest tentative conclusions reached just after the attack, scientists said yesterday. Continue reading

E.P.A. in the Cross Hairs

The Environmental Protection Agency and the White House Council on Environmental Quality have been sharply criticized for playing down the potential dangers of exposure to ash, smoke and dust generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center. Continue reading

Uncertainty Lingers Over Air Pollution in Days After 9/11

The air in Lower Manhattan after Sept. 11 has swirled back into the news — what people knew about it, when they knew it and what they said about it. Continue reading

Clinton Vows to Block E.P.A. Nominee to Pressure Agency

Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton said yesterday that she would block the nomination of Gov. Michael O. Leavitt of Utah as the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency until President Bush responded to her concerns about air quality around the World Trade Center. Continue reading

Fire Officials Upset at End Of a Program For Survivors

The New York City Fire Department is concerned about the scheduled end of a federally funded program that was established after the World Trade Center attack to provide crisis counseling for city firefighters and other survivors Continue reading

Inquiry Opens Into Effects Of 9/11 Dust

One of the biggest public health investigations in history opened yesterday in Lower Manhattan, aiming to follow the long-term physical and mental journeys of up to 200,000 people who were exposed to fire and smoke on Sept. 11, 2001. Continue reading