Archive of News (2012)

News stories by year:

9/11 cancer study won’t settle debate over risks

The most comprehensive study of potential World Trade Center-related cancers raises more questions than it answers and won’t end a debate over whether the attacks were really a cause. Continue reading

No increase in cancers to people exposed to twin towers debris: Study

Prostate cancer, thyroid cancer, and multiple myeloma jumped significantly for rescue and recovery workers who worked at Ground Zero or other sites where debris was taken, according to the Health Department study released Tuesday and appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association Wednesday. Continue reading

9/11 Cancer Study Raises More Questions Than It Answers; Unclear If Attacks Responsible For Illnesses

The most comprehensive study of potential World Trade Center-related cancers raises more questions than it answers and won’t end a debate over whether the attacks were really a cause. Continue reading

No Link Between Cancer and 9/11 Debris

Well this may complicate things. A New York City health-department study, released Tuesday, has found “no clear link” between cancer and 9/11 debris. The report, to be published in Wednesday’s issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association comes only months after the federal government added 58 different types of cancer to the list of illnesses covered by the $4.3 billion World Trade Center Fund. Continue reading

Report: 9/11 First Responders at High Risk for Three Cancer Types

New study says cases are 40 percent higher, but it’s difficult to gauge health fallout. Continue reading

9/11 Debris Not Direct Cause Of Cancer, NYC DOH Study Says

A new study conducted by the New York City Department of Health concludes that there is no clear relationship between cancer and the debris created from the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The study, which was released yesterday and obtained by the Times, surveyed 55,700 people who were exposed to the debris in Lower Manhattan, on barges, and on a Staten Island landfill. After looking at 23 different cancers between 2003 and 2008, researchers noted that the cancer rate overall was not greater for those exposed compared to the general population. Continue reading

9/11 Cancer Study Won’t Settle Debate Over Possible Risks Linked to Attacks

The study comes just a few months after the federal government added dozens of types of cancer to a list of illnesses related to the 9/11 attacks that will be covered by a program to pay for health coverage. Continue reading

Some Cancer Risks Higher in 9/11 Recovery Workers: Study

The workers who toiled at the World Trade Center site after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks may have higher-than-average risks of certain cancers, health officials reported. Continue reading

Study Finds No Clear Link Between 9/11 Debris Exposure and Cancer

Six months ago, the federal government added cancer to the list of sicknesses covered by the $4.3 billion World Trade Center fund. On Tuesday, it was revealed that a New York City health department study has found no clear link between cancer and the dust, debris, and fumes that were released by the wreckage of the twin towns, which fell in a terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. Continue reading

9/11 Health Concerns: Increased Risk for 3 Cancers

It’s a story we’ve been reporting on for more than a decade: The health of the brave, heroic responders who breathed in the dust, debris and fumes at the World Trade Center site in the hours, days and years following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Continue reading