News & Updates


August 9, 2003 -- White House Sway Is Seen In E.P.A. Response to 9/11
An investigation by the Environmental Protection Agency's inspector general into official statements about air quality after the collapse of the World Trade Center has found that White House officials instructed the agency to be less alarming and more reassuring to the public in the first few days after the attack. Continue reading

August 6, 2003 -- New York Times -- Smoke and Dust at Ground Zero Is Linked to Smaller Babies
Scientists say they have measured a slight but significant rise in the percentage of small babies born to women who were around the World Trade Center during or after the terror attack compared with babies of a large sample of pregnant women who were elsewhere at the time. Continue reading

February 21, 2003 -- New York Times -- Little Risk Seen In Downtown Air
Federal health officials have concluded that it is ''very unlikely'' that dust from the World Trade Center attack posed a significant health risk to people who lived downtown. The study, published yesterday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared air and surface dust samples collected in November and December 2001 in 30 downtown buildings with samples from buildings above 59th Street. Continue reading

February 21, 2003 -- New York Times -- Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: Little Risk Seen In Downtown Air
Federal health officials have concluded that it is ''very unlikely'' that dust from the World Trade Center attack posed a significant health risk to people who lived downtown. The study, published yesterday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared air and surface dust samples collected in November and December 2001 in 30 downtown buildings with samples from buildings above 59th Street. Continue reading

February 20, 2003 -- New York Times -- THREATS AND RESPONSES: MENTAL HEALTH; Long-Term Effects of Post-Trauma Events
Among New Yorkers who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after Sept. 11, 2001, those who have lost family members, lost jobs or experienced other stress since the attack are the most likely to still be having symptoms, researchers have found. Continue reading

January 28, 2003 -- Publication -- Federal Study Shows High Number of Ground Zero Workers Had Health Problems Last Year
Among the first wave of ground zero workers who came forward for physical examinations at the Mount Sinai Medical Center last summer, nearly three-fourths had ear, nose or throat problems more than 10 months after the World Trade Center attack, doctors said yesterday. More than half still had lung complaints or abnormal results in pulmonary function tests. Continue reading

January 22, 2003 -- New York Times -- Far From the Dust, a Persistent Cough; Man With Few Trade Center Ties Traces His Asthma to 9/11
Glenn H. Abatemarco got sick two weeks after terrorists attacked the World Trade Center, and he has still not fully recovered his ability to breathe normally. That in itself is not terribly unusual. Continue reading

January 3, 2003 -- Publication -- Study to Follow Those Exposed to Trade Center Ash
New York City and federal health officials are working out the final details of what they say would be the largest study of its kind ever undertaken -- a far-reaching health registry to follow as many as 200,000 people exposed to ash and dust from the destruction of the World Trade Center. Continue reading

December 28, 2002 -- New York Times -- No Serious Health Risks for Public Near Ground Zero, E.P.A. Reports
Most people living or working in the area around ground zero are unlikely to suffer serious short- or long-term health effects from the terror attack, according to a draft report released yesterday by the Environmental Protection Agency. But the report said anyone exposed in the early hours was at risk of chronic sickness, as many firefighters have already reported. Continue reading

December 22, 2002 -- New York Times -- ON POLITICS; Image Is Everything. Just Ask Christie Whitman.
Christie Whitman could not have had a good week. She was batting away rumors -- or perhaps planting them -- that she wanted out as the head of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Of course, the rumors recalled all those times that President Bush had smacked her in the face while environmentalists accused her of betraying the responsibility that she should never have been given. Continue reading